Recent Articles

A model of access to and continuance in Alcoholics Anonymous

Key Points:

These data from a nationally representative sample of US adults with alcohol use disorders revealed a robust significant association of high symptom severity with access, continuation and discontinuation from Alcoholics Anonymous.

The association of high symptom severity and negative life events supports the behavioral economic model of AA access and continuation as proposed in this paper.

Variables associated with access to AA were also associated with continuation in AA, except for the variables for gender and education level. Women were less likely to attend AA, but more likely to continue attending. College educated respondents were less likely to attend AA, but more likely to continue attending.

A sub-group of US adults with severe externalizing disorders, identified in this study, are associated with access to and continuation in AA

In the US there is a a significant geographic regional variation in access to and continuation in AA

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CHARACTERISTICS OF ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEMBERSHIP: 1992

Comparison of Americans with alcohol use disorders who 1) never attend AA, 2) attend AA and drop out, and 3) continue to attend AA.

  1.  INTRODUCTION In the US more people report going to an Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meeting than reported going to any other support or therapy group for an alcohol problem. [1] Despite the importance of accurate incidence and prevalence information on AA membership the research data has been sparse.    Data on membership in AA has been […]

PATHWAYS TO ABSTINENCE: IMPACT OF ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS

-The results of the present study support the effficacy of the fellowship of Alcoholics Anonymous to promote abstinence

-In 1992 Americans with alcohol use disorders who continued to attend AA were more likely to achieve abstinence (64%) than those who dropped out of AA (37%) or those who never attended AA (16%)

-Abstinence recovery status varies as a function of increasing age and level of severity of alcohol
symptoms.

-The findings suggest that a substantial portion of the “AA drop outs” attain sobriety or abstinence after a period of AA membership and maintain their abstinence without AA

– The unmet need for AA referral is concentrated in the younger age groups, 35% in the 18-29 years group and 30% in the 30-39 years age group.